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Blog about Spelling Rules, Reading Phonics, Vowels, Dyslexia, ESL, More

Welcome to Camilia’s blog about spelling!

 

camiliaI help children and adults with reading, spelling, and overcoming dyslexia. I specialize in teaching phonics and in helping those who everyone else has given up on them. 

Discoveries: I spent over 15 years intensely dissecting English, discovering exclusive 100 spelling rules, applying the rules in 600 phonics lessons, and making English spelling logical and possible for all ages and all types of learners.

Dyslexic persons can learn to spell logically: The learning style of a dyslexic person is a logical learning style. When logical explanations or spelling rules are provided, dyslexic persons can easily learn to spell and overcome reversing letters. They are not learning disabled; their learning style is simply different. Their brain is wired to memorize only things that make sense and reject things that do not make sense. When researchers see the difference in their brain, they mistakenly label this difference as a learning disability.

Dyslexia Can be Ended or Prevented: I have helped thousands of dyslexic students that learned and proved that dyslexia in spelling and in reversing letters does end after learning to spell, and after slowing down to write words slowly. In addition, they proved that dyslexia could be prevented before the 4th grade. Understanding how we get dyslexia is the key to end it it; simply read this short article to see how dyslexia is given to kids before the 4th grade  How do you get dyslexia?

I invite you to read my posts and leave a comment. Ask questions, and I promise to answer any questions you may ask about phonics, spelling and dyslexia. 

Lee Learn to Read and Spell Logically

In 1999, Lee was in the sixth grade, and according to his school records, he read at a first-grade level (level 1.6) and Lee was told he had dyslexia, ADD, and learning disabilities.

I helped Lee read and spell in less than a week. Please see Lee’s writing before and after the six months Lee Learned to Read in a Week!

Link to My Most Important Post

How do you get dyslexia?

 

Free Spelling Rule

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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Free Spelling Rule This first Free Spelling Rule teaches the Spelling of 38 Words Instantly Lesson 1: Do we spell with “cial” as in “social” or with “tial” as in “essential”? Rule: Spell with “cial” after a vowel as in “social” and with “tial” after a consonant as in “essential.” Details: The “cial” and “tial” […]

Free Spelling Rule This first Free Spelling Rule teaches the Spelling of 38 Words Instantly Lesson 1: Do we spell with “cial” as in “social” or with “tial” as in “essential”? Rule: Spell with “cial” after a vowel as in “social” and with “tial” after a consonant as in “essential.” Details: The “cial” and “tial” endings occur in approximately 38 words.   Practice vowel + cial in 11 words:  fa·cial  |  ra·cial  |  gla·cial  |  of·fi·cial  |  ben·e·fi·cial  |  ar·ti·fi·cial  |  su·per·fi·cial  |  ju·di·cial  |  spe·cial  |  cru·cial  |  so·cial consonant + tial in 20 words:  res·i·den·tial  |  pres·i·den·tial  |  cre·den·tial  |  pru·den·tial  |  con·fi·den·tial  |  po·ten·tial  |  ex·is·ten·tial  |  in·flu·en·tial  |  ref·er·en·tial  |  es·sen·tial   |  se·quen·tial  |  con·se·quen·tial  |  sub·stan·tial  |  cir·cum·stan·tial  |  ex·pe·ri·en·tial  |  par·tial  |  mar·tial  |  nup·tial  |  pre·nup·tial  |  tan·gen·tial Exceptions: Memorize these seven exceptions and the word “controversial” contradicts all the rules because it is spelled with an “s.”:  fi·nan·cial  |  com·mer·cial  |  pro·vin·cial  |  in·i·tial  |  spa·tial  |  pa·la·tial  |  con·tro·ver·sial Homework 1. Read the above 38 words aloud as many times as needed until you memorize their spelling. 2. On a piece of paper, copy these words and do not try to guess their spelling. Look at each word before you begin to copy it and do not look away from it until you are 100% confident that you can spell it:  facial  |  racial  |  glacial  |  official  |  beneficial   |  artificial  |  superficial  |  judicial  |  special  |  crucial  |  social   |  residential  |  presidential  |  credential  |  prudential  |  confidential  |  potential  |  existential  |  influential  |  referential  |  essential  |  sequential   |  consequential  |  substantial  |  circumstantial  |  partial  |  martial  |  nuptial  |  prenuptial  |  financial  |  commercial  |  provincial  |  initial  |  spatial  |  palatial  |  controversial  |  initially  |  controversially  |  potentially  |  experiential 3. Fill in the blanks using the endings “cial” or “tial” or “sial”:  so _ _ _ _ | essen _ _ _ _ | spe _ _ _ _ | fa _ _ _ _  | offi _ _ _ _ | substan _ _ _ _  | creden _ _ _ _ | residen _ _ _ _ | artifi _ _ _ _ | consequen _ _ _ _ | ra _ _ _ _ | poten _ _ _ _ | confiden _ _ _ _ | circumstan _ _ _ _ | cru _ _ _ _ | pruden _ _ _ _  | gla _ _ _ _ | referen _ _ _ _ | benefi _ _ _ _ | influen _ _ _ _ | judi _ _ _ _ | nup _ _ _ _ | par _ _ _ _ | mar _ _ _ _ | prenup _ _ _ _ | spa _ _ _ _ | pala _ _ _ _ | ini _ _ _ _ | finan _ _ _ _ | commer _ _ _ _ | provin _ _ _ _ | contraver _ _ _ _ | so _ _ _ _ ly | essen _ _ _ _ ly | spe _ _ _ _ ly | offi _ _ _ _ ly | par _ _ _ _ ly | ini _ _ _...

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Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically

Posted by on Dec 9, 2014 in Reading, Spelling | 1 comment

Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically About Memory Loss in India Why does India have some of the lowest prevalence rates of Alzheimer’s disease? Turmeric may be a factor but my study shows there is a significant linguistic factor involved. In India, the elderly have numerous people to talk to in and outside of their homes, and on daily basis. In fact, older people are considered a source of wisdom that is very much in demand. Grandparents in India continue to live with their grown children and grandchildren. Moreover, grandchildren respectfully converse with their grandparents. In other words, grandparents are continuously surrounded by friends and family members, conversing, processing thoughts, and communicating out loud.   About Memory Loss in the U.S. The elderly in the technologically developed countries like the U.S. are usually isolated in their homes and are not listened to; they may go days, weeks, months, or years without conversing with anyone. When people are deprived of speaking and processing thoughts for a long period, their language skills decline and eventually deteriorate. Naturally, lack of language skills leads to memory loss. Thoughts will not process mentally and psychologically unless they are spoken. Unprocessed thoughts are dangerous; people pay over $80 in hour to see a therapist to help them process thoughts. The relationship between language skills and memory is inseparable. If we don’t use language for a very long time, our senses become dull and we may end up with speech impairment or become dumb and deaf. Our ability to speak and express what we wish to say grows weaker, our hearing may decline because we do not get to hear ourselves speak, and some of us may become speech impaired due to hurrying when we do get to speak (we may acquire dyslexia in speech).   How to Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically Processing Thoughts: When people engage in conversations, they process thoughts, and their brains become sharper. Let your thought process through speech! Communicate out loud! Think out loud!  Spelling and Reading: Learn or re-learn the spelling of words from my spelling books. Read my books out loud. Since speaking is not always an option, reading aloud is the next best thing to speaking. Read aloud two or more pages of my spelling books a day and you will instantly feel the difference. Support the Invention of a Talking Robot: Inventing a robot that we can talk to and it can talk back and engages in intelligent discussions with us would be a significant way to prevent Alzheimer linguistically. People have been predicting that talking robots are just three years...

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Meaning of Phonics

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 in Dyslexia, Phonics, Reading, Spelling | 0 comments

Meaning of Phonics        What is phonics? What is the meaning of phonics? Phonics is a group of English sounds. A phonic is a single sound produced by 1) a letter that does not sound like its letter name, like the “o” in “to” or 2) by two or more letters, like the “ey” in “monkey” and the “sion” in “expression” or 3) by a plain letter that does sound like its letter name, like the “o” in “go.” 90 Sounds called Phonics spelled in 180 Ways There are approximately 90 English sounds that we call all of them together phonics, and the 90 sounds are spelled in over 180 ways we call spelling patterns. Learning the 26 plain letters and using them in a word like “fast” is the easy part of learning to read and spell. More complex is the process of learning all the letters that do not sound like their letter name (to), and all the combinations of letters that produce a single sound (expression). The most complex part of learning English phonics is identifying which letter or combination of letters to choose when spelling every sound in every English word. Now that we the meaning of phonics, we can understand the relationship between phonics and spelling difficulties. Sample Phonics Lesson Phonics lesson to teach the aw sound as in Dawn: Dawn took the straw·ber·ries out of the freez·er to let them thaw.  Dawn drank her straw·ber·ry shake with a straw.  Dawn ate raw veg·e·ta·bles and cole·slaw.  Dawn ate shrimp and prawns. Dawn was awe·some.  Dawn was not awk·ward.  Dawn spoke with a South·ern drawl.  Dawn gave a long, drawn-out speech at her job.  Dawn wan·ted to draw up a new plan.  Dawn wan·ted to draw back from the com·pa·ny’s old a·gree·ment.  Dawn saw a law·yer to dis·cuss busi·ness with him.  Dawn’s com·pa·ny spawned hun·dreds of new com·pa·nies.  Dawn wan·ted to with·draw her mon·ey from the com·pa·ny’s bank.  Dawn’s with·draw·al was a huge with·draw·al. Dawn saw the fish spawn in the wa·ter.  Dawn saw the taw·ny fawn at dawn.  Dawn saw the shark’s big jaws.  Dawn saw the ship being moored by a haw·ser.  Dawn saw the cat’s long claws and saw the cat claw·ing at the dog.  Dawn saw the dog’s paws as he pawed at the bone.  Dawn saw the hawk kill·ing a dove.  Dawn saw the dove’s maw.  Dawn said that see·ing the hawk kill·ing its prey was aw·ful.  Dawn heard the bulls bawl. Dawn re·mem·bers when her son, Law·son, crawled.  Dawn re·mem·bers when she saw Law·son daw·dling near the wall and she asked him not to daw·dle.  Law·son was a·ble to sprawl out his legs like a gym·nast.  Dawn read a book pub·lished by McGraw-Hill. Dawn’s yawn caused her son to yawn.  Law·son stud·ied law and be·came a law·ful law·yer. Dawn’s in-laws were im·mi·grants.  Dawn’s in-laws em·i·grat·ed from War·saw to the U.S.  Dawn’s father-in-law woke her up at dawn. Dawn’s father-in-law fixed the lawn·mower and mowed the lawn.  Dawn’s father-in-law used a jig·saw to trim the trees.  Dawn’s father-in-law used to be a car·pen·ter and he knew how to use a saw; he sawed wood for most of his life. Dawn’s mother-in-law was a raw·boned wom·an who liked to sit un·der the awn·ing.  Dawn’s sister-in-law was maw·kish and that gnawed and awed Dawn’s mother-in-law.  Dawn saw her brother-in-law pawn his watch at the pawn·shop.  Dawn saw...

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What are adverbs?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in English grammar, grammar, Reading, Spelling, spelling and grammar, verbs and adverbs, what is a noun?, what is a verb?, what is an adjective?, what is an adverb? | 0 comments

What are adverbs? What are adverbs? Adverbs describe verbs.   Adjective describe nouns, as in Sam is slow.  (Slow describes the noun Sam) Adverbs describe verbs, as in Sam drove slowly. (Slowly describes the verb drove) There is the word verb inside of adverb. Drove is a Verb The verb “drove” is the action done by the noun “Sam” in these four sentences: Sam drove. Sam, who stepped on an ant (subject), drove. Sam, who was stepped on (object), drove. Sam, who was slow (being described), drove. Hint: If you can add “ing” to the present tense of a word, then it is a verb, as in fly→flying. Slowly is an Adverb The adverb “slowly” describes NOT the noun Sam but the verb, which is the action done by the noun “Sam,” as in Sam drove slowly. When we say Sam drove slowly, the noun “Sam” is not the one being described, but his driving or action is being described. It is the verb “drove” that is being described, not the noun “Sam.” The adverb “slowly” describes NOT the noun “Sam,” but it describes the verb “drove”; it describes how Sam “drove” not how Sam is. The adverb slowly describes Sam’s driving condition. The adverb slowly describes Sam’s action of driving (Sam’s verbing). Again, the adverb slowly described the verb “drove,” not the person who was doing the driving. It is safe to say that adverbs are also adjectives but they describe verbs, not nouns. It is best to understand nouns and their adjectives before learning about verbs and their adverbs. Click here  Give back! Share or leave a...

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What are adjectives?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in English grammar, grammar, Reading, Spelling, spelling and grammar, verbs and adverbs, what is a noun?, what is a verb?, what is an adjective?, what is an adverb? | 0 comments

What are adjectives? What are adjectives? Adjectives describe nouns.  Adjectives are like tall, short, smart, and slow that describe nouns like Sam.   Nouns are like Sam, who is either tall, short, smart, slow, etc. Sam is a Noun The noun in all of the following three sentences is “Sam” Sam stepped on an ant. Sam was stepped on by an elephant. Sam was slow. In the first sentence above, the noun, “Sam” is the subject because he is the doer of the action (he stepped on an ant).  In the second sentence, the noun “Sam” is the object because something was done to him (he was stepped on by the elephant). In the third sentence, the noun “Sam” is being described by the adjective “slow” and no action was involved. Thus, the noun “Sam” can be a subject (the one who stepped on an ant), an object (the one who was stepped on), or the noun “Sam” can be described by the adjective (slow). Slow is an Adjective The adjective “slow” describes the noun “Sam” in these three sentences Sam, who stepped on an ant, was slow. Sam, who was stepped on, was slow. Sam was slow.  In the first sentence above, “slow” describes the noun “Sam” who is the subject. In the second sentence, “slow” describes the noun “Sam” who is the object. In the third sentence, the adjective “slow” simply describes the noun “Sam.” Thus, an adjective like “slow” can describe the noun “Sam” whether “Sam” is the subject (doer that stepped on something), the object (the one that was stepped on), or the one being described. What is a noun? What is a noun? A noun is a thing or a name of a thing that exists around us (Sam) or in our minds (freedom). Examples of nouns that exist around us are things we can see, touch, hear, taste, or smell (available to our five senses) like Sam, man, school, tree, coffee, cake, music, fragrance, etc. Examples of nouns that exist in our minds are freedom, love, wisdom, justice, maturity, and any other idea that can exist in our minds that we cannot see, touch, hear, taste, or smell.  Similar to the way adjectives describe nouns, adverbs describe verbs → Read more Give back! Share or leave a...

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What is a schwa?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a schwa? What is a schwa? A schwa is a weak sound of any vowel. A schwa is a name given to a weak sound of any vowel. The a sound, as in sep•a•rate is a schwa because it is a weak sound of an a that is barely heard. More examples of a schwa sound are in beggar, souvenir, credible, memory, and virus. The dictionary symbol for the schwa sound looks like an upside-down e like this ə. A Schwa Can be Confused with Other Vowel Sounds It is this weak sound of a vowel that is often confused with a different vowel sound. For instance, the a sound in sep•a•rate is weak and it is often confused with an e sound. It is this weak sound of an a that is called a schwa sound. The Stress is on Other Syllables The stress in a word is on other syllables, but never on the syllable where the schwa is. Again, the schwa is the unstressed sound of a vowel in a word, which is vaguely heard. Give back! Share, follow, or leave a comment!...

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What is a syllable?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a syllable? What is a syllable? A syllable is like me or like me in me•di•a A syllable is a small word like the word me, or a part of a word like the syllable me in me•di•a. A syllable must contain, at least, one vowel. A syllable can contain one or more vowels but it can ONLY have one vowel sound. Examples of Syllables ♦ There are two syllables in win•dow, win and dow ♦ There is only one syllable in cake ♦ There are three syllables in i•de•a ♦ There are four syllables in dic•tion•ar•y ♦ There are five syllables in so•phis•ti•cat•ed ♦ There are three syllables in beau•ti•ful Only One Vowel Sound Can be in a Syllable A syllable may contain one or more than one vowel, but it can only have ONE VOWEL SOUND. It is not the number of vowels in a syllable that matters, as long as those vowels make one sound. For instance, the syllable beau in beau•ti•ful contains three vowels, but only one vowel sound is heard, namely the u sound is heard, and ea in beau is silent. Because e and a are silent, the e and a do not count as sounding vowels in this syllable; it is like they don’t exist in this syllable. Silent vowels do not count in a syllable, and they cannot break free to form a new syllable. Only sounding vowels have power and can break away to form their own independent syllables, as in i•de•a. Likewise, there is only one vowel sound in cake. The only vowel sound heard in cake is a, and e is silent. Because e is silent in cake, the word cake cannot be divided into ca and ke. The ke would be soundless without a vowel sound in it; therefore, the silent e cannot count as a sounding vowel to form its own syllable. Give back! Share,  follow, or leave a comment!...

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Vowels and Consonants

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Phonics, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 1 comment

Vowels and Consonants What are vowels? Vowels rule English and learning them cannot be avoided Vowels are a, e, i, o, u, sometimes y as in sky, and sometimes w as in few (double u=w=uu), as in few=feuu. Both vowels and consonants are inconsistent but vowels are much more inconsistent; each vowel has, at least, 5 sounds and 12 spelling patterns. Every vowel has a short sound, a long sound, and a number of other sounds.  The symbols of long vowels are ā, ē, ī, ō, and ū. The symbols of short vowels are ă, ĕ, ĭ, ŏ, ŭ. A long vowel sounds like its letter name. As in fāte, the long ā sounds just like the name of the letter A. A short vowel is unique sound of a vowel, as in the unique short ă sound in făt. Vowels are the strong letters because they are filled with sounds; they are responsible for the sounds we make in our speech. Vowels are so strong; they often help each other in spite of having a consonant between them, as in fāte.  Focus your vision on the vowels when you read, because they are the important letters. Vowels rule English and learning all the rules that govern the spelling of vowels in words cannot be avoided.  Each vowel has several sounds we call phonics, which are spelled in many different ways we call spelling patterns: ♦  The vowel A has 5 major sounds, which are spelled in 12 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel E has 7 major sounds, which are spelled in 17 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel I has 8 major sounds, which are spelled in 19 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel O has 12 major sounds, which are spelled in 20 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel U has 6 major sounds, which are spelled in 28 spelling patterns. The First Two Rules of Vowels 1- The first rule of vowels: When two vowels are walking, the first one does the talking, as in rain, meat, tie, coat, and argue. 2- The second rule of vowels: Two vowels can still walk when there is only one consonant between them, as in fate, Pete, site, hope, and mute. One consonant between two vowels is too weak to keep the vowels from helping each other, and this is the reason consonants double so much, as in sitting, dressed, controlled, hopped, and grabbed. What are consonants? Consonants are the rest of the 26 English letters, which are b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, and z. Certain consonants occasionally sound and act like vowels, like the o in choir and the u in language.  The eight consonants c, g, h, q, s, x, w, and y are inconsistent because they make over 50 sounds we call phonics, which are spelled in 60 major ways we call spelling patterns. For instance, the consonant s sounds like its letter name in soap but like a z in rose, has, and bags. The Difference between Vowels and Consonants  Consonants are soundless unless they are paired with a vowel. Consonants are the weak letters and this is the reason for doubling consonants. For instance, the final s often doubles as in progress because one s is so weak; a single final s often doubles to keep itself from...

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Dyslexia in Spelling Can be Reversed

Posted by on Mar 11, 2013 in Dyslexia, Reading, Spelling | 0 comments

Dyslexia in Spelling Can be Reversed    See how dyslexia in given to kids before the 4th grade! What is dyslexia in spelling? Dyslexia in spelling means poor spelling plus writing letters in reverse. What causes dyslexia in spelling is lack of logic in the way English words are spelled; what causes dyslexia in writing letters in reverse is forced speed-reading before learning to spell words. Forced speed-reading before learning to spell causes seeing and then writing letters in reverse. Understanding how dyslexia is given to kids before the 4th grade is the key to ending it. To understand dyslexia, simply see How do you get dyslexia? Dyslexic persons learn differently; their learning style is a logical learning style. When logical spelling rules are provided, dyslexic persons do learn to read and spell. Dyslexia in spelling and in writing letters in reverse ends, after learning to spell and after slowing down to write words slowly. Lee, a sixth grader, had dyslexia and could not read or spell words. When logical spelling rules were provided, Lee learned to read and spell logically, see how →Lee Learned to Read in a Week! Require Logic before They Can Memorize Dyslexic persons are logical learners; they require logical spelling rules before they can memorize the spelling of English words. Their learning style is a logical learning style. They are born with a brain that is wired to accept and memorize what is logical and reject what is illogical. If no logical rules are provided, logical learns cannot remember which spelling pattern to choose when spelling a sound in a word. For instance, they may not remember when to choose an “f” or a “ph” to spell this sound in a word like “symphony.” However and if informed ahead of time that the letter “f” is not allowed in long words, logical learners will easily remember to spell “symphony” with a “ph.” This implies that logical learners can memorize the spelling of words and that they do not have learning disabilities or neurological learning deficiencies. When logic is provided, logical learners do indeed learn and memorize the spelling of English words. Dyslexia is Given to Kids before the 4th Grade Dyslexia in English spelling is usually given to kids before the 3rd grade, but only logical learners can have dyslexia in spelling. Lack of logic causes dyslexia in spelling; and, forced speed-reading before learning to spell words causes dyslexia in writing letters in reverse. Reading too fast, too soon causes persons with spelling difficulties to see letters in reverse, and eventually writing letters in reverse. Dyslexic persons are in a desperate need to read slowly in order to see the way words are written. Yet, they feel forced to speed-read, and speed-reading only worsens their situation. Speed in reading or in anything is a result of a process that one can achieve naturally; speed cannot be achieved through force. We cannot force babies to run before they can crawl or walk. Dyslexia in spelling is the most common type of dyslexia, but not the only type of dyslexia. Read more Dyslexia in Spelling Can End Dyslexia in spelling and in writing letters in reverse ends, after learning to spell and after slowing down to write words slowly. To help dyslexic persons learn, teach them in the way they...

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How do you get dyslexia?

Posted by on Mar 2, 2013 in Dyslexia, Reading, Spelling | 0 comments

How do you get dyslexia? See how dyslexia is given to kids before the 4th grade! The Six Steps to getting Dyslexia in Spelling and Reversing Letters Step 1: Questioning the Logic behind the way English Words are Spelled Logical Learners →Poor Spellers: Logical learners like, Albert Einstein who could not spell, are born with a brain that is wired to question the logic behind anything they are about to memorize; and they cannot memorize anything that does not make sense. Their learning style is a logical learning style; they are so logical, they expect to see “My cat is cute.” to be “Mi kat iz qut.” If they do not see the logic behind something, they cannot memorize it; and, there is nothing wrong with the way logical learners think or learn. In fact, they are the most coherent and rational thinkers; they simply cannot see the logic in the way English words are spelled.  The reason most people can read but cannot always remember the spelling of the words that they read is that one English sound can be spelled in many different ways. Typically, logical learners are the ones who ask for spelling rules to know when to spell an English sound one-way and not the other. If no spelling rules are provided, logical learners simply cannot memorize the spelling of English words and some of them cannot read at all. Logical children who only know the ABC’s are usually shocked when a great number of sentences like “My cat is cute.” are randomly thrown at them to read without any logical structure (whole language), and they wonder WHY they were told one thing when they were learning their ABC’s and then expected to read or write another. It is this big WHY that makes a huge difference between the two types of learners, who are born with two different wiring systems in their brains. It is because of this big WHY that logical learners (analyzers) fall behind in class while memorizers are reading at a faster pace. Step 2: Too Young to Form All the Questions They Need to Ask Because they are so young, logical children cannot form all the complex questions they wish to ask; and, the number of whys overwhelms them at such a young age. They may wish to ask their teachers why the “q” sound is spelled with a “cu,” why the “i” sound is spelled with a “y,” why the “z” sound is spelled with an “s,” and why the “k” sound is spelled with a “c”; but they cannot form such complex linguistic questions. Eventually, they become too overwhelmed with the number of questions they wish to ask, and then they decide to keep their mouths shut and put the blame upon themselves. Step 3: Falling Behind in Class As a result, logical children continue to fall behind in class, and no one realizes why they are falling behind. No one else around them knows what they have been through; even they, themselves, lose track of what is taking place. This entire episode happens so fast; it is like a quick nightmare that one forgets its details after waking up. Shortly after that, the commotion created around them and the worried parents lead these poor kids to believe they...

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