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Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically

Posted by on Dec 9, 2014 in Reading, Spelling | 1 comment

Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically About Memory Loss in India Why does India have some of the lowest prevalence rates of Alzheimer’s disease? Turmeric may be a factor but my study shows there is a significant linguistic factor involved. In India, the elderly have numerous people to talk to in and outside of their homes, and on daily basis. In fact, older people are considered a source of wisdom that is very much in demand. Grandparents in India continue to live with their grown children and grandchildren. Moreover, grandchildren respectfully converse with their grandparents. In other words, grandparents are continuously surrounded by friends and family members, conversing, processing thoughts, and communicating out loud.   About Memory Loss in the U.S. The elderly in the technologically developed countries like the U.S. are usually isolated in their homes and are not listened to; they may go days, weeks, months, or years without conversing with anyone. When people are deprived of speaking and processing thoughts for a long period, their language skills decline and eventually deteriorate. Naturally, lack of language skills leads to memory loss. Thoughts will not process mentally and psychologically unless they are spoken. Unprocessed thoughts are dangerous; people pay over $80 in hour to see a therapist to help them process thoughts. The relationship between language skills and memory is inseparable. If we don’t use language for a very long time, our senses become dull and we may end up with speech impairment or become dumb and deaf. Our ability to speak and express what we wish to say grows weaker, our hearing may decline because we do not get to hear ourselves speak, and some of us may become speech impaired due to hurrying when we do get to speak (we may acquire dyslexia in speech).   How to Prevent Alzheimer Linguistically Processing Thoughts: When people engage in conversations, they process thoughts, and their brains become sharper. Let your thought process through speech! Communicate out loud! Think out loud!  Spelling and Reading: Learn or re-learn the spelling of words from my spelling books. Read my books out loud. Since speaking is not always an option, reading aloud is the next...

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Meaning of Phonics

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 in Dyslexia, Phonics, Reading, Spelling | 0 comments

Meaning of Phonics        What is phonics? What is the meaning of phonics? Phonics is a group of English sounds. A phonic is a single sound produced by 1) a letter that does not sound like its letter name, like the “o” in “to” or 2) by two or more letters, like the “ey” in “monkey” and the “sion” in “expression” or 3) by a plain letter that does sound like its letter name, like the “o” in “go.” 90 Sounds called Phonics spelled in 180 Ways There are approximately 90 English sounds that we call all of them together phonics, and the 90 sounds are spelled in over 180 ways we call spelling patterns. Learning the 26 plain letters and using them in a word like “fast” is the easy part of learning to read and spell. More complex is the process of learning all the letters that do not sound like their letter name (to), and all the combinations of letters that produce a single sound (expression). The most complex part of learning English phonics is identifying which letter or combination of letters to choose when spelling every sound in every English word. Now that we the meaning of phonics, we can understand the relationship between phonics and spelling difficulties. Sample Phonics Lesson Phonics lesson to teach the aw sound as in Dawn: Dawn took the straw·ber·ries out of the freez·er to let them thaw.  Dawn drank her straw·ber·ry shake with a straw.  Dawn ate raw veg·e·ta·bles and cole·slaw.  Dawn ate shrimp and prawns. Dawn was awe·some.  Dawn was not awk·ward.  Dawn spoke with a South·ern drawl.  Dawn gave a long, drawn-out speech at her job.  Dawn wan·ted to draw up a new plan.  Dawn wan·ted to draw back from the com·pa·ny’s old a·gree·ment.  Dawn saw a law·yer to dis·cuss busi·ness with him.  Dawn’s com·pa·ny spawned hun·dreds of new com·pa·nies.  Dawn wan·ted to with·draw her mon·ey from the com·pa·ny’s bank.  Dawn’s with·draw·al was a huge with·draw·al. Dawn saw the fish spawn in the wa·ter.  Dawn saw the taw·ny fawn at dawn.  Dawn saw the shark’s big jaws.  Dawn saw the ship being moored by a haw·ser.  Dawn saw the cat’s long claws and saw the cat claw·ing at the dog....

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What are adverbs?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in English grammar, grammar, Reading, Spelling, spelling and grammar, verbs and adverbs, what is a noun?, what is a verb?, what is an adjective?, what is an adverb? | 0 comments

What are adverbs? What are adverbs? Adverbs describe verbs.   Adjective describe nouns, as in Sam is slow.  (Slow describes the noun Sam) Adverbs describe verbs, as in Sam drove slowly. (Slowly describes the verb drove) There is the word verb inside of adverb. Drove is a Verb The verb “drove” is the action done by the noun “Sam” in these four sentences: Sam drove. Sam, who stepped on an ant (subject), drove. Sam, who was stepped on (object), drove. Sam, who was slow (being described), drove. Hint: If you can add “ing” to the present tense of a word, then it is a verb, as in fly→flying. Slowly is an Adverb The adverb “slowly” describes NOT the noun Sam but the verb, which is the action done by the noun “Sam,” as in Sam drove slowly. When we say Sam drove slowly, the noun “Sam” is not the one being described, but his driving or action is being described. It is the verb “drove” that is being described, not the noun “Sam.” The adverb “slowly” describes NOT the noun “Sam,” but it describes the verb “drove”; it describes how Sam “drove” not how Sam is. The adverb slowly describes Sam’s driving condition. The adverb slowly describes Sam’s action of driving (Sam’s verbing). Again, the adverb slowly described the verb “drove,” not the person who was doing the driving. It is safe to say that adverbs are also adjectives but they describe verbs, not nouns. It is best to understand nouns and their adjectives before learning about verbs and their adverbs. Click here  Give back! Share or leave a...

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What are adjectives?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in English grammar, grammar, Reading, Spelling, spelling and grammar, verbs and adverbs, what is a noun?, what is a verb?, what is an adjective?, what is an adverb? | 0 comments

What are adjectives? What are adjectives? Adjectives describe nouns.  Adjectives are like tall, short, smart, and slow that describe nouns like Sam.   Nouns are like Sam, who is either tall, short, smart, slow, etc. Sam is a Noun The noun in all of the following three sentences is “Sam” Sam stepped on an ant. Sam was stepped on by an elephant. Sam was slow. In the first sentence above, the noun, “Sam” is the subject because he is the doer of the action (he stepped on an ant).  In the second sentence, the noun “Sam” is the object because something was done to him (he was stepped on by the elephant). In the third sentence, the noun “Sam” is being described by the adjective “slow” and no action was involved. Thus, the noun “Sam” can be a subject (the one who stepped on an ant), an object (the one who was stepped on), or the noun “Sam” can be described by the adjective (slow). Slow is an Adjective The adjective “slow” describes the noun “Sam” in these three sentences Sam, who stepped on an ant, was slow. Sam, who was stepped on, was slow. Sam was slow.  In the first sentence above, “slow” describes the noun “Sam” who is the subject. In the second sentence, “slow” describes the noun “Sam” who is the object. In the third sentence, the adjective “slow” simply describes the noun “Sam.” Thus, an adjective like “slow” can describe the noun “Sam” whether “Sam” is the subject (doer that stepped on something), the object (the one that was stepped on), or the one being described. What is a noun? What is a noun? A noun is a thing or a name of a thing that exists around us (Sam) or in our minds (freedom). Examples of nouns that exist around us are things we can see, touch, hear, taste, or smell (available to our five senses) like Sam, man, school, tree, coffee, cake, music, fragrance, etc. Examples of nouns that exist in our minds are freedom, love, wisdom, justice, maturity, and any other idea that can exist in our minds that we cannot see, touch, hear, taste, or smell.  Similar to the way adjectives...

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What is a schwa?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a schwa? What is a schwa? A schwa is a weak sound of any vowel. A schwa is a name given to a weak sound of any vowel. The a sound, as in sep•a•rate is a schwa because it is a weak sound of an a that is barely heard. More examples of a schwa sound are in beggar, souvenir, credible, memory, and virus. The dictionary symbol for the schwa sound looks like an upside-down e like this ə. A Schwa Can be Confused with Other Vowel Sounds It is this weak sound of a vowel that is often confused with a different vowel sound. For instance, the a sound in sep•a•rate is weak and it is often confused with an e sound. It is this weak sound of an a that is called a schwa sound. The Stress is on Other Syllables The stress in a word is on other syllables, but never on the syllable where the schwa is. Again, the schwa is the unstressed sound of a vowel in a word, which is vaguely heard. Give back! Share, follow, or leave a comment!...

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What is a syllable?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a syllable? What is a syllable? A syllable is like me or like me in me•di•a A syllable is a small word like the word me, or a part of a word like the syllable me in me•di•a. A syllable must contain, at least, one vowel. A syllable can contain one or more vowels but it can ONLY have one vowel sound. Examples of Syllables ♦ There are two syllables in win•dow, win and dow ♦ There is only one syllable in cake ♦ There are three syllables in i•de•a ♦ There are four syllables in dic•tion•ar•y ♦ There are five syllables in so•phis•ti•cat•ed ♦ There are three syllables in beau•ti•ful Only One Vowel Sound Can be in a Syllable A syllable may contain one or more than one vowel, but it can only have ONE VOWEL SOUND. It is not the number of vowels in a syllable that matters, as long as those vowels make one sound. For instance, the syllable beau in beau•ti•ful contains three vowels, but only one vowel sound is heard, namely the u sound is heard, and ea in beau is silent. Because e and a are silent, the e and a do not count as sounding vowels in this syllable; it is like they don’t exist in this syllable. Silent vowels do not count in a syllable, and they cannot break free to form a new syllable. Only sounding vowels have power and can break away to form their own independent syllables, as in i•de•a. Likewise, there is only one vowel sound in cake. The only vowel sound heard in cake is a, and e is silent. Because e is silent in cake, the word cake cannot be divided into ca and ke. The ke would be soundless without a vowel sound in it; therefore, the silent e cannot count as a sounding vowel to form its own syllable. Give back! Share,  follow, or leave a comment!...

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