SpellingRules.com

Exclusive 100 Spelling Rules applied in 600 Phonics Lessons in 10 Books for Children and Adults to Read and Spell Hundreds of Words at a Time

Navigation Menu

What is a schwa?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a schwa? What is a schwa? A schwa is a weak sound of any vowel. A schwa is a name given to a weak sound of any vowel. The a sound, as in sep•a•rate is a schwa because it is a weak sound of an a that is barely heard. More examples of a schwa sound are in beggar, souvenir, credible, memory, and virus. The dictionary symbol for the schwa sound looks like an upside-down e like this ə. A Schwa Can be Confused with Other Vowel Sounds It is this weak sound of a vowel that is often confused with a different vowel sound. For instance, the a sound in sep•a•rate is weak and it is often confused with an e sound. It is this weak sound of an a that is called a schwa sound. The Stress is on Other Syllables The stress in a word is on other syllables, but never on the syllable where the schwa is. Again, the schwa is the unstressed sound of a vowel in a word, which is vaguely heard. Give back! Share, follow, or leave a comment!...

Read More

What is a syllable?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 0 comments

What is a syllable? What is a syllable? A syllable is like me or like me in me•di•a A syllable is a small word like the word me, or a part of a word like the syllable me in me•di•a. A syllable must contain, at least, one vowel. A syllable can contain one or more vowels but it can ONLY have one vowel sound. Examples of Syllables ♦ There are two syllables in win•dow, win and dow ♦ There is only one syllable in cake ♦ There are three syllables in i•de•a ♦ There are four syllables in dic•tion•ar•y ♦ There are five syllables in so•phis•ti•cat•ed ♦ There are three syllables in beau•ti•ful Only One Vowel Sound Can be in a Syllable A syllable may contain one or more than one vowel, but it can only have ONE VOWEL SOUND. It is not the number of vowels in a syllable that matters, as long as those vowels make one sound. For instance, the syllable beau in beau•ti•ful contains three vowels, but only one vowel sound is heard, namely the u sound is heard, and ea in beau is silent. Because e and a are silent, the e and a do not count as sounding vowels in this syllable; it is like they don’t exist in this syllable. Silent vowels do not count in a syllable, and they cannot break free to form a new syllable. Only sounding vowels have power and can break away to form their own independent syllables, as in i•de•a. Likewise, there is only one vowel sound in cake. The only vowel sound heard in cake is a, and e is silent. Because e is silent in cake, the word cake cannot be divided into ca and ke. The ke would be soundless without a vowel sound in it; therefore, the silent e cannot count as a sounding vowel to form its own syllable. Give back! Share,  follow, or leave a comment!...

Read More

Vowels and Consonants

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Blog, Phonics, Reading, Spelling, Vowels | 3 comments

Vowels and Consonants What are vowels? Vowels rule English and learning them cannot be avoided Vowels are a, e, i, o, u, sometimes y as in sky, and sometimes w as in few (double u=w=uu), as in few=feuu. Both vowels and consonants are inconsistent but vowels are much more inconsistent; each vowel has, at least, 5 sounds and 12 spelling patterns. Every vowel has a short sound, a long sound, and a number of other sounds.  The symbols of long vowels are ā, ē, ī, ō, and ū. The symbols of short vowels are ă, ĕ, ĭ, ŏ, ŭ. A long vowel sounds like its letter name. As in fāte, the long ā sounds just like the name of the letter A. A short vowel is unique sound of a vowel, as in the unique short ă sound in făt. Vowels are the strong letters because they are filled with sounds; they are responsible for the sounds we make in our speech. Vowels are so strong; they often help each other in spite of having a consonant between them, as in fāte.  Focus your vision on the vowels when you read, because they are the important letters. Vowels rule English and learning all the rules that govern the spelling of vowels in words cannot be avoided.  Each vowel has several sounds we call phonics, which are spelled in many different ways we call spelling patterns: ♦  The vowel A has 5 major sounds, which are spelled in 12 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel E has 7 major sounds, which are spelled in 17 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel I has 8 major sounds, which are spelled in 19 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel O has 12 major sounds, which are spelled in 20 spelling patterns. ♦  The vowel U has 6 major sounds, which are spelled in 28 spelling patterns. The First Two Rules of Vowels 1- The first rule of vowels: When two vowels are walking, the first one does the talking, as in rain, meat, tie, coat, and argue. 2- The second rule of vowels: Two vowels can still walk when there is only one consonant between them, as in fate, Pete, site, hope, and mute. One consonant between...

Read More